The Universe of Discourse


Tue, 02 Jul 2019

Philadelphia Slaughterhouse Hotel

More information about the mysterious slaughterhouse hotel has come to light, thanks to Chas. Owens, Pete Krawczyk, and this useful blog post by D.S. Rosenstein.

Most important, the perplexing “hotel” is not intended for humans. “Hotel” is apparently stockyard jargon for a place where livestock are quartered temporarily just prior to slaughter. I am so glad to have this cleared up.

Also, M. Rosenstein has a photograph of the fancy abattoir with the spires:

An isometric drawing of
the  abbatoir, which  is a handsome and
ornate building, featuring four blue spires at each corner. A grayscale photograph of
the abattoir depicted at left.  The Schuylkill river is in the
foreground.  The spires are clearly visible.  To left and right are
low storage buildings.  The abattoir has one very high lower story of
dark brick, surmounted by a lighter-colored cupola with tall windows
and an arched roof with a skylight.

They don't make industrial buildings like they used to. Check out the ornamental pattern in the bricks on the lower floor and the baluster along the riverside façade.

More details here.

[ Addendum: Josh Bevan of Hidden City Philadelphia on When Cattle Men Reigned In The West (of Philadelphia). ]


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Philadelphia Slaughterhouse Hotel

Yesterday on my other blog I posted about the most hilariously mislocated hotel I've ever heard of. It's the hotel that in 1910 was located in the Philadelphia stockyards, just the other side of the railroad tracks from the hog pens, between the slaughter house and the abbatoir:

A portion of a map, with buildings
marked in yellow and pink.  Several large yellow buildings, surrounded
and cut through with rail lines, are labeled CATTLE PENS.  Pink
buildings on the left and right are SLAUGHTER HOUSE and ABBATOIR.  In
between is a smaller pink building labeled HOTEL.  Just north of the
hotel are the HOG PENS.

I thought that would be the end of it, but Chas. Owens did a little digging around and found a picture of the hotel, provided by the Greater Philadelphia GeoHistory Network. It's from R. Hexamer's insurance survey of 1877. At that time, the building was partly a hotel and partly the offices of the Philadelphia Stock Yard Company.

An isometric drawing of the site of
the office and hotel building, with “Stable and Hay Loft” to its
right, “Abbatoir” in the foreground, and “Pump House” in the
background.  These buildings, being brick, are colored pink; others
made of wood are colored yellow.  The abbatoir is a handsome and
ornate building, featuring four blue spires at each corner.

The survey includes a map of the site and a description of the facilities. Here's the detailed plan of the hotel:

Plan of the buildings,
including descriptions (Offices, 2 story, 43 feet by 78; hotel, 3
story, 43 feet by 100; both brick
with tin roof) and other details.

The full image is 105 MB:

An isometric drawing of the site of
the office and hotel building, with “Stable and Hay Loft” to its
right, “Abbatoir” in the foreground, and “Pump House” in the
background.  These buildings, being brick, are colored pink; others
made of wood are colored yellow.  The abbatoir is a handsome and
ornate building, featuring four blue spires at each corner.

None of these buildings is still standing. (As I mentioned yesterday, the site is now occupied by the Cira Centre.) But the neighborhood's history as the center of Philadelphia's meatpacking district is not completely lost. According to this marvelous article from Hidden City Philadelphia, in 1906 the D.B. Martin company built a new combination office building and slaughterhouse only two blocks away at 3000 Market Street. Here's my favorite detail from the article:

Five hundred head of cattle at a time would be held on the rooftop cow pens, right above the heads of the company’s executives,

That building still stands, although I believe it's no longer used as a slaughterhouse.

[ Addendum 20190702: The “hotel” is explained: it is a temporary residence for livestock, not for humans. ]


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