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Tue, 15 Jul 2014

Types are theorems; programs are proofs

[ Summary: I gave a talk Monday night on the Curry-Howard isomorphism; my talk slides are online. ]

I sent several proposals to !!con, a conference of ten-minute talks. One of my proposals was to explain the Curry-Howard isomorphism in ten minutes, but the conference people didn't accept it. They said that they had had four or five proposals for talks about the Curry-Howard isomorphism, and didn't want to accept more than one of them.

The CHI talk they did accept turned out to be very different from the one I had wanted to give; it discussed the Coq theorem-proving system. I had wanted to talk about the basic correspondence between pair types, union types, and function types on the one hand, and reasoning about logical conjunctions, disjunctions, and implications on the other hand, and the !!con speaker didn't touch on this at all.

But mathematical logic and programming language types turn out to be the same! A type in a language like Haskell can be understood as a statement of logic, and the statement will be true if and only if there is actually a value with the corresponding type. Moreover, if you have a proof of the statement, you can convert the proof into a value of the corresponding type, or conversely if you have a value with a certain type you can convert it into a proof of the corresponding statement. The programming language features for constructing or using values with function types correspond exactly to the logical methods for proving or using statements with implications; similarly pair types correspond to logical conjunction, and union tpyes to logical disjunction, and exceptions to logical negation. I think this is incredible. I was amazed the first time I heard of it (Chuck Liang told me sometime around 1993) and I'm still amazed.

Happily Philly Lambda, a Philadelphia-area functional programming group, had recently come back to life, so I suggested that I give them a longer talk about about the Curry-Howard isomorphism, and they agreed.

I gave the talk yesterday, and the materials are online. I'm not sure how easy they will be to understand without my commentary, but it might be worth a try.

If you're interested and want to look into it in more detail, I suggest you check out Sørensen and Urzyczyn's Lectures on the Curry-Howard Isomorphism. It was published as an expensive yellow-cover book by Springer, but free copies of the draft are still available.


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